Another Story We’ve Heard Before

As (hopefully) everyone in tobacco knows now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Tobacco Products issued its long-awaited proposal to regulate e-cigarettes, cigars, little cigars, hookah, pipe tobacco and other tobacco products. This regulation proposes to extend basic authorities found in the Tobacco Control Act to all other tobacco products (including e-cigarettes, cigars, little cigars, hookah, and pipe tobacco), such as:

  • Registration by all manufactures with FDA, including a list of all tobacco products they sell
  • Disclosure of ingredients by manufacturers to FDA
  • Prohibit the sales of tobacco products to anyone under the age of 18
  • Eliminate free sampling of all tobacco products
  • Good manufacturing practice requirements
  • Premarket review for any “new” tobacco product
  • Premarket review of any product wishing to make a “modified risk or harm” claim

A week later, this headline caught my eye on the Center’s news article feed on our website. At the end of the article the commentator urges city and county decision makers in Arizona “to wait at least for the FDA to act on the current e-cigarette proposals before proceeding on their own with more regulations.”

For those of us who’ve been in tobacco control for a while it’s not surprising to hear this — we’ve heard this argument over and over whenever state laws are being considered in Sacramento. This is used as an argument by our opponents to stop local communities and decision makers from working on local policies. However, we all know that local communities should not wait for the state or federal government to act in order to enact policies that will protect people from harmful secondhand smoke and these harmful products. Our communities and residents should not have to wait.unty decision makers in Arizona “to wait at least for the FDA to act on the current e-cigarette proposals before proceeding on their own with more regulations.”

In fact, starting with smokefree workplaces, the history of tobacco control policies in California shows that many new strong policies started at the local level and were only adopted by the state after a number of cities and counties had enacted them. And the same applies in this case when it comes to the FDA. Especially when we know that it is legal and perfectly acceptable for communities to continue to take action on these products while waiting for the FDA process to continue to move forward. How about your community? Is it continuing to take action on these products?

– Vanessa Marvin

Post a Comment

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*