Tag Archives: Tobacco Policy

State of Tobacco Control 2015

Hello world! A brand new and improved State of Tobacco Control – California Local Grades report is 6 months away from showing off its new changes! This is my third year working on this report and I believe this new grading methodology will highlight cities with the best tobacco control policies while pushing other jurisdictions to adopt stronger policies to protect the health of their community. Staff from all over the state were involved in these conversations and none of these changes in the report’s methodology were made lightly.

A major change occurring in this new methodology is in the Smokefree Housing Section. When the methodology for this report was first developed six years ago, there were very few smokefree housing policies passing and we were not sure what they would look like in the future. Since then, the bar has been raised by cities and counties across the state passing strong policies in all areas. Now that we know what these strong policies in housing look like, we are able to create a stronger grading methodology that will reflect these strong policies that we know will improve the health of California residents.

Another big change is the inclusion of a new section called Emerging Issues Bonus Points. This section lists Read More »

Everyday Can Be Independence Day For Our Military

Guest Blogger – Colleen Haydon, Program Manager, Project UNIFORM (Undoing Nicotine Influence From Our Respected Military)/CYAN

As we all recover from our 4th of July holiday, it’s a good time to reflect upon just what independence means. In my world in military tobacco control, independence means many things and that includes a life free of tobacco. There’s been a lot of talk lately about the role of tobacco in the military. Recently, the Secretary of the Navy (SecNav) announced his intent to prohibit the sale of tobacco on Navy and Marine Corps installations and ships. While the SecNav is taking steps to reduce tobacco use in the military, others are strongly opposing stronger tobacco restrictions.

I have dedicated the last eight years of my professional life to this topic and the connection to independence is clear to me. Tobacco makes one dependent. Tobacco controls lives. Tobacco, when used as directed, can kill you. There is nothing about tobacco that deserves the attention of our nation’s bravest and most valuable members. It has been suggested that military service men and women already put their lives at risk every day as a part of their duties so denying them tobacco is a waste of time.

With all due respect to those who have made these misguided claims, I emphatically disagree and reject your premise.

  • First, it is because our nation’s military service men and women are put in harms way on a daily basis that tobacco has no place in that reality. From updated equipment to appropriate training, we do all we can to protect our Service Members from harm to ensure that they survive whatever horrible situation they are put into. Read More »

Another Story We’ve Heard Before

As (hopefully) everyone in tobacco knows now, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Tobacco Products issued its long-awaited proposal to regulate e-cigarettes, cigars, little cigars, hookah, pipe tobacco and other tobacco products. This regulation proposes to extend basic authorities found in the Tobacco Control Act to all other tobacco products (including e-cigarettes, cigars, little cigars, hookah, and pipe tobacco), such as:

  • Registration by all manufactures with FDA, including a list of all tobacco products they sell
  • Disclosure of ingredients by manufacturers to FDA
  • Prohibit the sales of tobacco products to anyone under the age of 18
  • Eliminate free sampling of all tobacco products
  • Good manufacturing practice requirements
  • Premarket review for any “new” tobacco product
  • Premarket review of any product wishing to make a “modified risk or harm” claim

A week later, this headline caught my eye on the Center’s news article feed on our website. At the end of the article the commentator urges city and county decision makers in Arizona “to wait at least for the FDA to act on the current e-cigarette proposals before proceeding on their own with more regulations.” Read More »

The City of Los Angeles’s E-cigarette Ordinance Is Now In Effect

E-cigarettes have become the topic of concern and discussion in many cities and counties across the nation. This is not surprising since e-cigarette companies have proliferated communities with their claims that their products are a safe alternative to smoking that can be used in any location. As a matter of fact, there is no evidence establishing the safety of e-cigarettes. In addition, there is no evidence that shows that the vapor emitted from e-cigarettes is safe to inhale.

E-cigarettes are available in over 250 flavors, which include Captain Crunch, gummy bear, cotton candy, and Fruit Loops. As can be seen from some of the available flavors of e-cigarettes it is clear that there is a highly targeted effort to get youth to start using e-cigarettes. All of these issues were at the forefront of the Los Angeles City Council on March 4, 2014 when they voted unanimously to prohibit the use E-cigarettes wherever cigarettes are currently prohibited. This includes indoor workplaces,parks, beaches, and outdoor dining areas. Read More »

Thoughts on Prop 99’s Silver Anniversary

To celebrate the 25th Anniversary of Proposition 99, the California Tobacco Tax, the Center is lucky to have the campaign directer of Prop 99, Jack Nicholl as a guest blogger. To commemorate this day, Mr. Nicholl will be speaking at the Center’s Information and Education Days’ Meet & Greet.

California voters passed Proposition 99 twenty-five years ago.  Last November’s silver anniversary marked a generation of amazing progress in public health. The vote in 1988 was 58% yes, 42% no, a landslide in today’s politics.  It was a crazy election with 29 ballot measures (3 on auto insurance alone) and resulted in big Republican victories: George HW Bush elected as president and Pete Wilson returned to the US Senate.

From early in 1988 when we began polling, it looked like we could win; but the public health world was skeptical.  California Medical Association undercut the campaign while sitting on the Executive Committee because they feared the tobacco companies would attack doctors and those who worked on the unsuccessful ballot measures restricting indoor smoking in 1978 and 1980 said the industry would beat us.  The political establishment knew the power of Big Tobacco and they were certain we would lose.

But those of us sticking our necks out saw things differently. Read More »